146988

9780553213638

Ten Plays by Euripides

Ten Plays by Euripides
$6.51
$3.95 Shipping
List Price
$7.95
Discount
18% Off
You Save
$1.44

  • Condition: New
  • Provider: Mediaoutdeal1234 Contact
  • Provider Rating:
    67%
  • Ships From: Springfield, VA
  • Shipping: Standard

   30-day money back guarantee
$1.50
$3.95 Shipping
List Price
$7.95
Discount
81% Off
You Save
$6.45

  • Condition: Good
  • Provider: HippoBooks Contact
  • Provider Rating:
    86%
  • Ships From: Multiple Locations
  • Shipping: Standard
  • Comments: Spine creases, wear to binding and pages from reading. May contain limited notes, underlining or highlighting that does affect the text. Possible ex library copy, will have the markings and stickers associated from the library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, may not be included.

   30-day money back guarantee
$20.00
$3.95 Shipping

Your due date: 12/20/2021

$7.95
  • Condition: Good
  • Provider: a_teambooks Contact
  • Provider Rating:
    65%
  • Ships From: Multiple Locations
  • Shipping: Standard, Expedited
  • Comments: Used books may not include access codes or one time use codes. Proven Seller with Excellent Customer Service. Choose expedited shipping and get it FAST.

   30-day money back guarantee

Ask the provider about this item.

Most renters respond to questions in 48 hours or less.
The response will be emailed to you.
Cancel
  • ISBN-13: 9780553213638
  • ISBN: 0553213636
  • Publication Date: 1984
  • Publisher: Bantam Classic & Loveswept

AUTHOR

Hadas, Moses, McLean, John, Euripides

SUMMARY

ALCESTIS CHARACTERS Apollo Death Chorus, elders of Pherae Handmaid Alcestis, wife of Admetus Admetus, King of Pherae Eumelus, son of Admetus and Alcestis Heracles Pheres, father of Admetus Butler Guards, attendants, mourners The scene represents the palace of Admetus at Pherae. Alcestis was acted in 438 b.c. [Enter Apollo, gorgeously dressed, with bow and quiver.] APOLLO. House of Admetus, in which I condescended to put up with a slave's table, I a god! Zeus was the cause: he killed my son Asclepius by hurling the lightning into his breast, and I in my anger slew the Cyclopes who fashion Zeus' fire; for this has the father constrained me to do bond service to a mortal man. I came to this land and tended cattle for my host, and I preserved his house to this day. In the son of Pheres I found a pious man, as I myself am pious, and I rescued him from death by tricking the Fates. These deities agreed that Admetus could escape Hades for the present by offering in exchange another body to the spirits below. He canvassed and solicited all his friends, his aged father and the mother who bore him, but he found no one except his wife willing for his sake to die and to forgo the light of day. His wife is now moving about the house supported in his arms and is gasping her last, for upon this day it is fated for her to die and quit this life. I am leaving the friendly shelter of these halls lest the pollution of death come upon me within doors. Already I perceive Death hard by, the priest of the dead who is ready to lead her down to the house of Hades. Punctually does he arrive; he has been watching for this day upon which she must die. [Enter Death, in a fearful and gloomy dress, with a bare sword.] DEATH. Ha! Ha! What are you up to outside the palace, why are you prowling about here, Phoebus? Are you at your tricks again? Appropriating the dues of the powers below and ending our perquisites? Was it not enough for you to prevent the death of Admetus by beguiling the Fates with a sly trick? Now you have armed your hand with a bow to keep guard also over this woman, this daughter of Pelias, who saved her husband by undertaking to die for him herself. APOLLO. Never fear. Justice and fair arguments are on my side. DEATH. What need of a bow if justice is on your side? APOLLO. It is my habit to wear it always. DEATH. Yes, and to give illegal aid to this house. APOLLO. I am weighed down by the predicament of a man that is my friend. DEATH. Will you deprive me of this second body too? APOLLO. I did not take that other from you by force. DEATH. Why then is he upon the earth, and not below ground? APOLLO. Because he gave his wife as ransom, for whom you are now come. DEATH. Yes, and I shall drag her below, underneath the earth. APOLLO. Take her and go; I doubt if I can persuade you---- DEATH. To kill whom I must? Why, that is my office. APOLLO. Not so, but to cast death upon those that are ripe for it. DEATH. I understand your logic--and your zeal! APOLLO. Is there any way, then, that Alcestis may reach old age? DEATH. There is not. Consider that I too take pleasure in my prerogatives. APOLLO. You would not be getting more than a single life. DEATH. When the young die I gain the greater prize. APOLLO. But if she die old she will be buried magnificently. DEATH. Phoebus! You lay down your law in favor of the rich. APOLLO. How do you mean? You a sophist too? Who would have thought it? DEATH. Those who could, would buy the privilege of dying old. APOLLO. Then you will not grant me this favor? DEATH. No. You know my ways. APOLLO. Yes, hateful to men and loathed by the gods. DEATH. You cannot have everything which is not your due. APOLLO. Yet will you forbear, exceedingly cruel though you are. A man will come to the house of Pheres, sent by Eurystheus to fetch a team of horHadas, Moses is the author of 'Ten Plays by Euripides', published 1984 under ISBN 9780553213638 and ISBN 0553213636.

[read more]

Questions about purchases?

You can find lots of answers to common customer questions in our FAQs

View a detailed breakdown of our shipping prices

Learn about our return policy

Still need help? Feel free to contact us

View college textbooks by subject
and top textbooks for college

The ValoreBooks Guarantee

The ValoreBooks Guarantee

With our dedicated customer support team, you can rest easy knowing that we're doing everything we can to save you time, money, and stress.